EO Kids: Sky High: Keeping Track of Volcano Plumes

EO Kids: Sky High: Keeping Track of Volcano Plumes

This month, EO Kids is blasting into the sky and following the trails of volcanic plumes as they travel across the globe. In this issue, you will discover how satellites help us make air travel safer in the aftermath of an eruption. You can create your own flipbook animation and track the traveling ash and gas in this month’s activities. Plus, see a volcano in 3-D.

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore Earth with us.

Sky High: Keeping Track of Volcano Plumes - Download PDF (3.1 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue:

Read more about volcanic plumes from these other resources:

Image Credits:

Page 1: Stock image of atmosphere (Fotolia), Grímsvötn (NASA Earth Observatory), Klyuchevskoi (NASA Earth Observatory)
Page 2: Frankenstein artwork from 1831 inside cover of Frankenstein (Public Domain), Acid Rain stock image (Fotolia), Puyehue-Cordón Caulle sulfur dioxide (NASA Earth Observatory), Kilauea (NASA Earth Observatory)
Page 3: Anaglyph (NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL-Caltech, MISR Team), MISR cartoon image (NASA/JPL/Shigeru Suzuki and Eric M. De Jong, Solar System Visualization Project)
Page 4: Stock photo of eruption (Fotolia), Images of flipbook construction (Ginger Butcher)


EO Kids: Shrinking Shorelines and Developing Deltas

EO Kids: Shrinking Shorelines and Developing Deltas

This month, EO Kids is exploring the muddy waters of the Mississippi Delta. Follow the sediment as it travels down the river and discover how satellites help us find where the shoreline is shrinking and where it is gaining new ground. Plus, think like a scientist and see if you can solve the mystery of the disappearing delta wetland in this month’s activity.

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore Earth with us.

Shrinking Shorelines and Developing Deltas - Download PDF (1.8 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue:



EO Kids: (Infra)Red Light, Green Light

EO Kids: (Infra)Red Light, Green Light

This month, EO Kids is exploring our green Earth. As spring turns the Northern Hemisphere green with new life, discover how satellites help us look at plant health all over our planet. Plus, do your own experiment and find out what colors are hidden in your leaves.

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore Earth with us.

(Infra)Red Light, Green Light - Download PDF (1.5 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue:

Read more about monitoring plant health with NASA’s satellites from these other NASA resources:




EO Kids: 60 Years of Looking at Earth from Above

EO Kids: 60 Years of Looking at Earth from Above

Launching this month on EO Kids, we’re looking at the history of viewing Earth from space, from Explorer 1 to our modern constellations of satellites. In this issue, learn about how NASA began watching Earth’s weather and how satellite imaging of hurricanes has evolved over 60-years. Plus, build your own liquid-fueled fizzy rocket with your own team of engineers.

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore Earth with us.

60 Years of Looking at Earth from Above - Download PDF (3.3 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue:

Learn more about hurricanes and NASA’s early satellites from these other NASA resources:

Activity



EO Kids: Ice on Earth

EO Kids: Ice on Earth

This month, EO Kids is covering a “cool” topic in Earth science. The newest edition of EO Kids, Ice on Earth: By Land & By Sea, covers two types of ice on the Earth’s surface and how NASA scientists use satellites to study these frozen features from space. Plus, follow two NASA scientists on their extreme camping trip for science across an unexplored stretch of Antarctica.

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore our Earth with us.

Ice on Earth - Download PDF (2.8 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

See what’s cool about sea ice:

Find out what’s happening to Antarctica’s ice shelves:

Learn more about albedo of Earth’s surfaces:

Notes From the Field – Sledding Around Antarctica


Credits:
Valerie Casasanto, Brian Campbell, Tassia Owen, Ginger Butcher, Mike Carlowicz, and Dr. Christopher Shuman, scientist

EO Kids: Space Archaeology: Uncovering the Past

EO Kids: Space Archaeology: Uncovering the Past

This month, EO Kids is “digging in” to Earth science. In the newest edition of EO Kids, Space Archaeology: Uncovering the Past, kids can learn about how different types of sensors on satellites are used to find past civilizations. Plus, they can create their own remote sensing experience with a digital camera and some popsicle sticks in the DIY “Science Activity: Ancient-Civilization Sandbox.”

At EO Kids we are committed to making Earth science fun and engaging. Come explore our Earth with us.

Space Archaeology: Uncovering the Past - Download PDF (6.3 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

Secrets Beneath the Sand
Hidden Under New England’s Green Canopy
Peering through the Sands of Time
Sediments Betray Hidden Shipwrecks

EO Kids: Ocean Green: Blooming Oceans

EO Kids: Phytoplankton

EO Kids, a publication from the Earth Observatory, highlights science stories for a younger audience. In our new edition, we explore the swirling seas of phytoplankton blooms and invite kids to create their own NASA science visualization by making a flipbook. Read about how these tiny organisms are making a big impact on our living Earth. Flip through the pages and see the ocean change color as phytoplankton blooms and the land changes between brown and green as the seasons change. Watch as the Earth comes alive with the flip of a page.

At EO Kids we are committed to making science fun and engaging. Come explore our earth.

Ocean Green: Blooming Oceans - Download PDF (4.2 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

Dynamic Spring Weather in North Atlantic Waters
Phytoplankton feature
The Greenup of the Planet
ClimateBits: Phytoplankton
Pacific life: How is it related to ocean temperature?

EO Kids: Landslides

EO Kids: Landslides

EO Kids, a publication from the Earth Observatory, highlights science stories for a younger audience. The latest issue explores how NASA observes and measures landslides from space.

When can landslides happen? What can trigger a landslide? How is NASA using satellite data to find and prepare for potential landslides? Find the answers and more in the latest issue of EO Kids, Landslides: Earth on the Move.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. Make your own mini-landslide in this issue’s Maker Corner. Find out just how much rain it takes to trigger a landslide with DIY Science. Create your own graph and compare annual rain amounts for a real landslide in Data Viz. Finally, meet NASA scientist and landslide expert, Dalia Kirschbaum, to find out what she and her team are doing to help people prepare for potential landslides.

Landslides - Download PDF (18.5 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

Automating the Detection of Landslides
World of Change: Devastation and Recovery at Mount St. Helens
Before and After the Sunkosi Landslide
Mudslide Near Collbran, Colorado
Landslide and Barrier Lake near Oso, Washington
Landslide in Zhouqu, China
A Monster Slide

EO Kids: Urban Heat Islands

EO Kids: Urban Heat Islands

EO Kids brings engaging science stories from Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

This issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures urban heat islands from space.

What makes an urban heat island? Why is New York City a "hot" town? Where are the hottest places on Earth? How can NASA scientists help city planners turn down the heat? Read this and more in the newest issue of EO for Kids.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making your own green roof bird-feeder. Figure out how much of a city is paved and developed in this issue's Data Viz. Research the urban heat island in your own backyard with some DIY Science. What do city lights and urban heat islands have in common? Find out when you are the Data Detective.

Explore this "hot" topic as only NASA can with NASA Earth Observatory's EO Kids.

Urban Heat Islands - Download PDF (8.7 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

The Making (and Breaking) of an Urban Heat Island
Vegetation Limits City Warming Effects
Beating the Heat in the World's Big Cities
Where Is the Hottest Place on Earth?
In the City, Bright is the New Black
New York City
New York City Temperature and Vegetation

EO Kids: Fresh Water

EO Kids: Fresh Water

Introducing a new publication from Earth Observatory – EO Kids – bringing engaging science stories from Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

The premier issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures fresh water from space. Find out why Lake Mead appears to have a bathtub ring around its shoreline and how less snow in the mountains means less drinking water for California. Explore satellite images of where fresh water is stored in and on the Earth. Discover what NASA does in the field with an update from scientists on the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX) campaign.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making a model aquifer and a self-watering planter. Explore the science behind fresh water with a snowmelt experiment and be a data detective by analyzing satellite data like a scientist. Kids can even create their own data visualization by coloring in a map showing ice thickness on Greenland.

Fresh Water - Download PDF (10.5 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

Visualizing the Highs and Lows of the Lake Mead Reservoir
Snowpack in the Sierra Nevada
Irrigation at Todhia Arable Farm in Saudi Arabia
Water vapor in afternoon clouds over the Amazon
Permafrost on the northern Siberian Coast
Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX) 2015: Olympic Efforts to Measure Olympic Mountain Snow

EO Kids

EO Kids is written for audiences between the ages of 9 to 14. It is published with support from NASA's Landsat, Terra, and Aqua missions.

EO Kids Team

Ginger Butcher, Editor in Chief
Tassia Owen, Managing Editor
Michael Carlowicz, Associate Editor
Autumn Burdick, Senior Science Writer
Kristen Weaver, Science Writer and Education Specialist
Dorian Janney, Science Writer and Education Specialist
Valerie Casasanto, Science Writer
Abigail Nastan, Science Writer
Mike Taylor, Data Visualizer
Kevin Ward, Earth Observatory Group Manager

We would appreciate any comments or feedback you could provide to us about this new publication (e.g., content, style, format): Let us know what you think.