EO Kids: Urban Heat Islands

EO Kids: Urban Heat Islands

EO Kids brings engaging science stories from Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

This issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures urban heat islands from space.

What makes an urban heat island? Why is New York City a "hot" town? Where are the hottest places on Earth? How can NASA scientists help city planners turn down the heat? Read this and more in the newest issue of EO for Kids.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making your own green roof bird-feeder. Figure out how much of a city is paved and developed in this issue's Data Viz. Research the urban heat island in your own backyard with some DIY Science. What do city lights and urban heat islands have in common? Find out when you are the Data Detective.

Explore this "hot" topic as only NASA can with NASA Earth Observatory's EO Kids.

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Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

The Making (and Breaking) of an Urban Heat Island
Vegetation Limits City Warming Effects
Beating the Heat in the World's Big Cities
Where Is the Hottest Place on Earth?
In the City, Bright is the New Black
New York City
New York City Temperature and Vegetation

Previous Issues

EO Kids: Fresh Water

EO Kids: Fresh Water

Introducing a new publication from Earth Observatory – EO Kids – bringing engaging science stories from Earth Observatory to a younger audience.

The premier issue of EO Kids explores how NASA observes and measures fresh water from space. Find out why Lake Mead appears to have a bathtub ring around its shoreline and how less snow in the mountains means less drinking water for California. Explore satellite images of where fresh water is stored in and on the Earth. Discover what NASA does in the field with an update from scientists on the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX) campaign.

EO Kids offers hands-on activities, experiments and more. The Maker Corner provides instructions for making a model aquifer and a self-watering planter. Explore the science behind fresh water with a snowmelt experiment and be a data detective by analyzing satellite data like a scientist. Kids can even create their own data visualization by coloring in a map showing ice thickness on Greenland.

Download PDF (10.5 MB)

Here are some of the Earth Observatory stories highlighted in this issue of EO Kids.

Visualizing the Highs and Lows of the Lake Mead Reservoir
Snowpack in the Sierra Nevada
Irrigation at Todhia Arable Farm in Saudi Arabia
Water vapor in afternoon clouds over the Amazon
Permafrost on the northern Siberian Coast
Olympic Mountains Experiment (OLYMPEX) 2015: Olympic Efforts to Measure Olympic Mountain Snow

EO Kids

EO Kids is written for audiences aged 9 to 14. It is published with support from NASA's Landsat, Terra, and Aqua missions.

EO Kids Team

Ginger Butcher, Editor in Chief
Tassia Owen, Managing Editor
Michael Carlowicz, Associate Editor
Autumn Burdick, Senior Science Writer
Kristen Weaver, Science Writer and Education Specialist
Dorian Janney, Science Writer and Education Specialist
Valerie Casasanto, Science Writer
Abigail Nastan, Science Writer
Mike Taylor, Data Visualizer
Kevin Ward, Earth Observatory Group Manager

We would appreciate any comments or feedback you could provide to us about this new publication (e.g., content, style, format): Let us know what you think.