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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

Redoubt Volcano Stirs
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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

Composed of visible and infrared light, this image shows a relatively calm-looking Redoubt Volcano on May 5, 2009. The only visible sign of activity is a steam plume at the summit.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Land Volcanoes Snow and Ice

Plume from Mount Redoubt
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Plume from Mount Redoubt

A GOES image shows a plume from Mount Redoubt rising above the surrounding clouds before dissipating and spreading northward on March 26, 2009.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes

Redoubt Volcano Stirs
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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

A series of three images of the Earth’ limb from a Japanese weather satellite captures a dramatic view of an ash plume from Mt. Redoubt reaching the stratosphere.

Atmosphere Volcanoes Remote Sensing

Steam Plume from Mount Redoubt
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Steam Plume from Mount Redoubt

A MODIS image of Redoubt from April 7, 2009, shows a nearly white volcanic plume, likely consisting primarily of water vapor.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes

Lahars Near the Drift River Oil Terminal
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Lahars Near the Drift River Oil Terminal

Lahars from Alaska’s Mt. Redoubt Volcano pass close to the Drift River Oil Terminal in an image acquired on April 4, 2009.

Image of the Day Land Water Volcanoes Snow and Ice

Ashfalls from Redoubt Volcano
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Ashfalls from Redoubt Volcano

Activity at Mount Redoubt caused rapid changes on the nearby landscape in early April 2009.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes Snow and Ice

Redoubt Volcano Stirs
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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

A MODIS image from April 4, 2009, shows a zigzag plume blowing from Mount Redoubt, as well as snowy surfaces changed by ash.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes

Redoubt Volcano Stirs
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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

A MODIS image shows a translucent beige-gray plume blowing from Mount Redoubt across Cook Inlet on April 1, 2009.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes

Mount Redoubt Stirs
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Mount Redoubt Stirs

In contrast to the explosive eruptions of the previous week, ash emissions from Mount Redoubt became more frequent but confined to lower altitudes on March 30, 2009. The commercial satellite GeoEye-1 captured a high-resolution view of the volcano the same day.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes

Mt. Redoubt Volcano, Alaska
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Mt. Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

On March 26, 2009, Redoubt Volcano sent a column of ash some 19,800 meters (65,000 feet) above sea level, and sent a lahar through the Drift River Valley.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Land Volcanoes Snow and Ice Remote Sensing

Redoubt Volcano Stirs
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Redoubt Volcano Stirs

A plume of ash extended south from Alaska’s Mount Redoubt following a large eruption on March 26, 2009.

Land Volcanoes

Ashfall from Redoubt Volcano
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Ashfall from Redoubt Volcano

Mount Redoubt sent a column of ash some 19 kilometers skyward. On March 23, 2009, ash was visible on the snowy land surface north of the volcano.

Atmosphere Land Volcanoes Snow and Ice

Ash Plumes from Redoubt Volcano
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Ash Plumes from Redoubt Volcano

Thermal infrared images reveal ash plumes from Alaska’s Mt. Redoubt Volcano on March 23, 2009.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Land Volcanoes Remote Sensing

Redoubt Volcano Summit
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Redoubt Volcano Summit

This satellite image shows volcanic features on the summit of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. Scientists believe an eruption at the volcano is likely in the coming weeks and months.

Land Volcanoes Snow and Ice