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New Activity on Kilauea

Volcanoes, Vog, and Vortices
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Volcanoes, Vog, and Vortices

Vog haze is transported hundreds of kilometers downwind of the Big Island of Hawaii, forming subtle but distinct alternating swirls.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Water Volcanoes

Kilauea Lava Lingers Near Pahoa
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Kilauea Lava Lingers Near Pahoa

For several months, residents of the Hawaiian town of Pahoa have been watching the June 27 lava flow warily.

Image of the Day Heat Volcanoes Human Presence

Sulfur Dioxide and Vog from Kilauea
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Sulfur Dioxide and Vog from Kilauea

In late April 2008, Kilauea Volcano Volcano on Hawaii’s big island continued its pattern of increased activity, including elevated seismic tremors and emissions from the volcano’s Halema‘uma‘u vent.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Volcanoes

Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Kilauea
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Sulfur Dioxide Plume from Kilauea

Kilauea is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, but it is of the sort that tends to ooze lava more often than it explodes. But starting on March 19, a small explosion rained rock and ash over the summit. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory warned on March 28 that sulfur dioxide concentrations in the air downwind from the volcano were likely to be hazardous. Even before the March 19 explosion, elevated sulfur dioxide levels prompted the National Park Service to close part of Crater Rim Drive.

Image of the Day Atmosphere Land Volcanoes