Migration Mystery: Meet our Final Space Robins

May 4th, 2016 by Brian Weeks and Ruthie Oliver

Brian and Ruthie here!

Natalie and Willem packed up their bags and flew the coop over the weekend. It was sad to see them go, but we’ve been here until we could find the rest of our space robins. And now we are proud to introduce our final eight space robins!

Robins in the rain

Even though it’s late April and probably feels a lot like spring wherever you are, we woke up to cold wintry mornings the past few days. You might think that rain would dampen our spirits, but we were excited to open our nets because we were hoping the robins wouldn’t want to travel in the rain and wind. Birds can stay warm even in a cold rain because their feathers keep the water off their skin.

As it turns out, a flock settled on our lawn to look for worms! And that’s how we met Birdie Sanders, Twitter, and Skyler. After they were suited up, they flew right back to join their friends!

Skyler is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mr. Lane’s 5th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

Skyler is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mr. Lane’s 5th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

 

Twitter is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. Wagner’s 4th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

Twitter is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. Wagner’s 4th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

 

Birdy Sanders is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mr. Tan’s 5th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

Birdy Sanders is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mr. Tan’s 5th grade class. (photo credit: Ruthie Oliver)

Tuesday the sun finally broke through the clouds! The warm lawn must have looked like a great place to stop for lunch because we ended up finding our final four space robins out there.

Trooper is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mrs. Caunitz and Mrs. Barsanti’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

Trooper is an adult male. His name was chosen by Mrs. Caunitz and Mrs. Barsanti’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

 

Flappy is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Ms. Murphy and Mrs. Nadler’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

Flappy is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Ms. Murphy and Mrs. Nadler’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

 

Hippy is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Ms. O’brien’s 5th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

Hippy is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Ms. O’brien’s 5th grade class. (Photo credit: Nicole Krikun)

Journey is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. Sutton’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

Journey is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. Sutton’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

 

And… our final space robin is Sky!

Sky is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. McFadden and Mrs. Viola’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

Sky is an adult female. Her name was chosen by Mrs. McFadden and Mrs. Viola’s 4th grade class. (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

 

We’ve certainly made a lot of new robin friends on this trip, but robins aren’t the only species migrating through the area. Some of our favorites are a Sharp-shinned Hawk (check out those red eyes!), Fox Sparrow, and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker! Sharp-shinned Hawks don’t just look fierce, they are real predators. They eat lots of smaller birds, including robins – eek! You can learn more about them here: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sharp-shinned_Hawk/id, https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Fox_Sparrow/id.

 

We now have 17 space robins flying for us!

Thanks for all your help along the way!

P.S. Chirpie has made a new friend up here at the Boreal Centre. Hope you’ve enjoyed reading the blog as much as they have! (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

P.S. Chirpie has made a new friend up here at the Boreal Centre. Hope you’ve enjoyed reading the blog as much as they have! (Photo credit: Brian Weeks)

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11 Responses to “Migration Mystery: Meet our Final Space Robins”

  1. Ryan says:

    Why is that most of the birds that you have been catching adult males.

  2. Marco says:

    Does the water rui the GPS tags? Could it break the circuit? :confused:

  3. CJ says:

    Which bird is the heaviest now that you have caught all of your birds? I hope they live long lives.

  4. Nick says:

    That is so funny. Now chirpy has a new best friend.

  5. Julia says:

    have you named the chirpy’s friend yet and if so what is his name.

  6. Chris pniewski says:

    that is so amazing that you guys have already 17 space birds.I cant belive that you guys have captured all these birds and named them for every single class.You guys have went in there forest for ages and you guys did it.IM imprest!

  7. Tavian says:

    Its really funny how u found chirpy a friend and that theres 17 birds out flying hope big macs there.

  8. Sia says:

    I am really curious to see where all the Space Robins will go. I am also really sad though that there won’t be any more entries. I wonder what’s causing the migration mystery.

  9. Esther says:

    I <3 Chirpy's friend!!!!! How many robins have you caught in all?

  10. Aidan says:

    It was exciting seeing the robins you found , the information you got and the ways you caught the birds.This site made me smarter and more informed about robins.

  11. Bill Ainsworth says:

    i’m sorry, I don’t understand are these robins on the ISS?

    Your response would be appreciated
    Thank you
    I am a disabled veteran and follower of earth observatory.nasa.gov

Notes from the Field