I Can See My Home from Here — Landsat Contest

June 4th, 2012 by Mike Carlowicz

From the Landsat team at NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey…

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Landsat Earth-observing program — which first rocketed into space on July 23, 1972 — NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey will be giving something special to members of the American public. NASA will create customized Landsat chronicles of changing local landscapes for six U.S. citizens who enter the “My American Landscape” contest.

To enter, all you have to do is send an e-mail describing the landscape changes in your home area and what you hope to learn about them from Landsat’s four decades of observations from space.┬áThe deadline for submissions is Wednesday, June 6, 2012. Contest winners will be announced live on NASA Television at a Landsat 40th anniversary press briefing on Monday, July 23. Click here for more details.

How to Enter

Answer the following questions in an email to:

HQ-LandsatContest@mail.nasa.gov

1) What types of landscape changes interest you in your area? Select one or more from this list: farms and fields; forests; cities and suburbs; lakes, rivers, and coasts; natural disasters; wildlife habitat.

2) Describe in at least 100 words the local changes you are interested in and what you hope to learn about them from a Landsat “space chronicle.”

3) Your name
4) The county and state where you live
5) Your e-mail address

3 Responses to “I Can See My Home from Here — Landsat Contest”

  1. AMOL S KULKARNI says:

    WONDERFUL NO WORDS TO DESCRIBE.

    THANKS

    AMOL S KULKARNI

  2. fabienne Jonieaux says:

    d’avance merci!!

    Paris, France, Europe

  3. Austin says:

    Muncie, Indiana, 47304

    I am curious too not only what is happening around the world, but more specifically where I am currently located at. These changes are having dramatic impacts on countries around the world, but also to the earths atmosphere, which is the key contributor to this problem. I am interested in learning about the sudden heat rise-large droughts-and shorter winter spans.