Results for: 2001

When Land Slides

When Land Slides

Data imaging techniques provide scientists with new tools to study and map landslides. Read more

Research Satellites for Atmospheric Science, 1978-Present

Research Satellites for Atmospheric Science, 1978-Present

NASA and its affiliated agencies and research institutions developed a series of research satellites that have enabled scientists to test new remote sensing technologies that have advanced scientific understanding of both chemical and physical changes in the atmosphere. Read more

New Light on Ice Motion

New Light on Ice Motion

MODIS' unprecedented high resolution reveals clues to Antarctic topography and ice history. Read more

Verner Suomi

Verner Suomi

Using a unique combination of determination, hard work, inspiration, and those freshman physics, Suomi became known as the "father of satellite meteorology." His research and inventions have radically improved forecasting and our understanding of global weather. Read more

Hurricane Field Studies

Hurricane Field Studies

The Third Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX3) has provided forecasters with a more realistic storm picture. Read more

Clouds in the Balance

Clouds in the Balance

In 1998, atmospheric scientists discovered a significant change in cloud vertical structure triggered by the strongest El Niño on record. Read more

Power to the People

Power to the People

Thanks to a team at NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC), engineers and amateur inventors worldwide now have free access to global-scale data on natural renewable energy resources. Private companies are using these data to design, build, and market new technologies for harnessing this energy. The best part is many of these new systems will be marketed at affordable prices in underdeveloped countries for those who need them most. Read more

A View From Above

A View From Above

International scientists with diverse backgrounds work together to better understand movement of carbon between the Earth's forests and atmosphere. Read more

Well Grounded

Well Grounded

A team effort allows scientists to validate and make MODIS data accessible to a wide audience. Read more

Measure for Measure

Measure for Measure

Governments and policy makers turn to science to better understand the impacts of global sea level rise on coastal cities. Read more

Ultraviolet Radiation: How It Affects Life on Earth

Ultraviolet Radiation: How It Affects Life on Earth

Stratospheric ozone depletion due to human activities has resulted in an increase of ultraviolet radiation on the Earth's surface. The article describes some effects on human health, aquatic ecosystems, agricultural plants and other living things, and explains how much ultraviolet radiation we are currently getting and how we measure it. Read more

Life on the Brink

Life on the Brink

Data demonstrate that populations cluster--in increasingly greater numbers--near active volcanoes. Scientists theorize that while attractions offset perceived risks, such willingness to chance eruptions increases the potential for disaster. Read more

Location, Location, Location

Location, Location, Location

Scientists review geographic factors to learn why wealth concentrates predominantly in temperate zones. Read more

A Violent Sun Affects the Earth's Ozone

A Violent Sun Affects the Earth's Ozone

A new study confirms a long-held theory that large solar storms rain electrically charged particles down on Earth's atmosphere and deplete the upper-level ozone for weeks to months thereafter. New evidence from NASA and NOAA satellites is helping scientists better understand how man and nature both play a role in ozone loss. Read more

Reverberations of the Pacific Warm Pool

Reverberations of the Pacific Warm Pool

Over the past several decades, scientists have uncovered a number of El Nino-like climate anomalies across the globe. One of the most recent to be discovered takes place in the Indo-Pacific warm pool. This body of water, which spans the western waters of the equatorial Pacific to the eastern Indian Ocean, holds the warmest seawaters in the world. Over a period of roughly two decades, the warm pool's average annual temperatures increase and then decrease like a beacon. These oscillations may affect the climate in regions as far away as the southern United States and may be powerful enough to broaden the extent of El Nino. Read more

In the Eyewall of the Storm

In the Eyewall of the Storm

Scientists have sought a greater understanding of the hurricane intensification process to improve forecasting techniques and decrease the radius of coastal evacuations. A new study using CAMEX-3 hurricane data reveals the role of "hot towers" in increasing a storm's fury. Read more

John Martin

John Martin

John Martin devoted his career to understanding the basic chemical processes that govern life in the ocean. His famous ‘iron hypothesis’ not only changed the way in which scientists view the ocean, but also introduced a controversial method for lowering carbon dioxide emissions in the atmosphere. Read more

Astronauts Photograph Mount Pinatubo

Astronauts Photograph Mount Pinatubo

In early 1991, Mt. Pinatubo, a volcano north of Manila on the Philippine island of Luzon, had been dormant for more than 500 years. Few geologists would have guessed that it would produce one of the world's most explosive eruptions in the twentieth century. Read more

Watching Plants Dance to the Rhythms of the Ocean

Watching Plants Dance to the Rhythms of the Ocean

NASA scientists developed a new data set that enables them to observe the teleconnections between sea surface temperature anomalies and patterns of plant growth on a global scale. Read more

From the Dust Bowl to the Sahel

From the Dust Bowl to the Sahel

Severe drought and poor soil conversation practices contribute to desertification. Read more

When the Dust Settles

When the Dust Settles

African dust can both benefit and harm Caribbean coral reefs. Read more

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun

Wernher von Braun's crowning achievement, as head of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, was to direct the mission to land the first men on the Moon in July 1969. Read more

Amazing Atolls of the Maldives

Amazing Atolls of the Maldives

Though scientists have been studying atolls at least since the mid-1800s, many mysteries remain about exactly how they form and what factors determine their shape. Using satellite imagery collected by Landsat 7, scientists are attempting to discern if monsoons played a role in shaping the Maldives. Read more

Biomass Burning

Biomass Burning

Biomass burning is the burning of living and dead vegetation, including both human-initiated burning for land clearing, and burning induced by lightning and other natural sources. Researchers with the Biomass Burning Project at NASA Langley Research Center are seeking to understand the impact that biomass burning has on the Earth's atmosphere and climate. Read more

Forecasting Fury

Forecasting Fury

Experts predict a period of elevated storm activity during the next 15 years. However, data from the SeaWinds instrument aboard NASA's QuikSCAT satellite could allow researchers to detect potential hurricanes up to two days earlier than with traditional forecasting methods. Read more

Mapping the Decline of Coral Reefs

Mapping the Decline of Coral Reefs

Coral reefs represent some of the densest and most varied ecosystems on Earth. Over the past 50 years the health of these reefs have been declining. Using high-resolution satellite imagery, scientists are locating the reefs that are in the most trouble. Read more

Where Frogs Live

Where Frogs Live

Researchers use remote sensing to monitor amphibian health. Read more

Astronaut Photography: Observing Earth from the International Space Station

Astronaut Photography: Observing Earth from the International Space Station

The Destiny Laboratory aboard the International Space Station includes the best optical quality window ever flown on a human-occupied spacecraft. Through this window, astronauts are photographing the Earth’s surface as part of an early project, called Crew Earth Observations Read more

Alfred Wegener

Alfred Wegener

Alfred Wegener proposed the theory of continental drift - the idea that the Earth's continents move over hundreds of millions of years of geologic time - long before the idea was commonly accepted. Read more

Precision Farming

Precision Farming

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, NASA, and NOAA are among key agencies contributing to precision farming revolution. The goal is to improve farmers' profits and harvest yields while reducing the negative impacts of farming on the environment that come from over-application of chemicals. Read more

Lovely, Dark and Deep

Lovely, Dark and Deep

Mysteries of ocean mixing yield to TOPEX/POSEIDON. Read more

New Tools for Diplomacy

New Tools for Diplomacy

Remote sensing technology, increasingly crucial to the understanding of Earth's climate and environmental processes, now permits the monitoring of global environmental conditions and the gathering of data that were historically unavailable. Read more

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1998-2014
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World of Change

Satellite images showing how our world— forests, oceans, cities, even the Sun— has changed in recent decades.
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Blue Marble

Composite satellite images of the entire Earth.
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Earth at Night

The night side of Earth twinkles with light in these composite global and regional views.
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Experiments

Hands-on educational activities.
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Visible Earth

A catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet.
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NASA Earth Observations

View, download, and analyze imagery of Earth science data.
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NASA Global Climate Change

Vital signs of the planet.
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Earth Science Picture of the Day

Photos of Earth processes and phenomena.
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